Fashion Plate: 1828, Vandyke Cuffs and Renaissance Flair

1829

Floral details on the pelerine

The left lady features a walking dress. It’s material seems to be gros de naples (a heavy silk with a dull finish), it was often used in carriage and walking dresses as it was fairly sturdy. The back turned cuffs continue to be in vogue but instead of the Vandyke style they come to a point. The skirt of the dress has floral appliques which curve in opposition to the design of the pelerine, bringing the focus of the eye to the waist. The neckline is finished with a lace ruff.

The evening dress is white and pink satin. Pink riband detailing of the skirt taper at the waist enhancing a small waist. The bodice piece is finished off with two small tassels. The sleeves are ‘a la Marie and reminiscent of the Renaissance.

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5 Comments Add yours

  1. laura frantz says:

    Wonderful post:) I think the fashions of yesteryear are exquisite sans the corsets. The fabrics and femininity are so lovely. I’ve been thinking of doing a book signing in period dress and these fashion plates add to the appeal of that. Now to find a colonial gown and hat!

    1. Thank you, Laura! πŸ™‚

      They are beautiful, the good news is I’ve seen a lot more lace, ruffles, and puffed sleeves lately so femininity is making a comeback. The popularity of Downton Abbey might bring some Edwardian Era looks back into fashion too.

      I hope that you’re able to find a Colonial gown. πŸ™‚

  2. Dessie says:

    I love these! Thanks so much for educating us on truely feminine fashions. I wish we could all still wear dresses like this…and not get crazy stares from others! πŸ™‚

  3. phylly3 says:

    I’ve just noticed that hairstyle on the right reminds me of some of the strange styles in the miniseries Wives & Daughters. Very intricate! It seems rather odd to see an Elizabethan collar on the left model. It must have been very uncomfortable. The plaid ribbon also reminds me of the dreaded plaid dress in W&D. LOL!

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